Wednesday, 12 January 2022

Cleaning The Log Burner

 

Recently, I spent an afternoon visiting a friend and opposite me sat a shiny log burner with a clean glass in the door and a pretty arrangement inside the firebox (remember, it is summer here).

I came home and sat in front of a dull log burner with very dirty glass, and felt like I was missing the mark somewhere.

Mr Google to the rescue!  Lots of information on the best way to clean that dirty door.




Brush off any loose ash, then dip a paper kitchen towel in some water and squeeze out before dipping it into some of the fine ash in the firebox (you don’t want cinders as they may scratch the glass).

Now wipe off all that gunk from the glass – it is really that easy!

Use a clean damp paper towel to rinse off, and then another one dipped in 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water to remove the last smears.

Dry off with a clean dry paper towel.




The exterior was given a good wipe down with a damp cloth, but I haven’t managed any arrangement in the firebox.  That is possibly just a bit too fancy for this household!

You learn something new every day 😊

Margaret.


26 comments:

  1. Good job Margaret!! What would we do without Google?

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  2. It's always a good feeling when you dig in and do a little deep cleaning. It brings me great satisfaction :)

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  3. Oh, wow, what a difference!
    And, well. To learning. I´m kinda full, though ;-)

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  4. Yes - I once had that job - not the easiest, but one that I was pleased to have done! That was way before we ended up with a heat pump... but I still say you can't beat a good fire
    Stay safe
    Blessings
    MAxine

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    1. Nothing looks quite as nice or warming as a real fire :)

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  5. Well done. Ours is often very cloudy but I leave to the official fire starter to clean it. Actually I think he uses your method with the ashes. I must remember when I do the final clean at the end of winter

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  6. It makes me glad that I don't have a wood stove!

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  7. We have made notes. We will be returning to our UK home this year - and a log burner that probably hasn't been cleaned or had its chimney swept in all the years we have been away. Thanks and send regards to Mittens xxx Mr T

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    1. Our chimney needs sweeping as well, but I am leaving organizing that to Son :)

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  8. That’s worth knowing. I use toothpaste on the windows of our our gas “pretend” log burner. Works a treat.

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  9. Well, I learned something new! As for something in the firebox. I think inprefer it as a firebox. But maybe if I seen one with an arrangement in bbn it I would feel different.

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  10. Great job! Vinegar and water work wonders together!

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  11. I'd put something really strange or different in it and watch people try and work out what it is and how long before they give in or think they would be too rude to ask. Then, of course, there would be the people who just wouldn't notice if you put a skull in it.

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    1. Haha. Son prints out a lot of things on his 3-D printers, including small skulls. Maybe I should ask him to give me a little pile of them :)
      But then it is mostly me who looks at it, so maybe not!!

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  12. Accomplishment!

    Hooray!

    I think we need a similar source of heat.

    Years ago, we converted our regular fireplace, and got a wood burning stove. Not a big one. I had to maintain that fire and heat. It was a terrible job because it wasn't big. Had to let it go out each night, and start it early in morning. Bank it down some, if I went out during day. Get it up again, when I came home.

    Not the best situation.

    I'm sure yours is a much simpler operation....

    Merry Midwinter Wishes
    🌲🌟πŸ”₯🌲πŸ”₯🌟🌲🌟πŸ”₯🌲πŸ”₯🌟🌲

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    1. Over winter, I usually let son operate the fire.
      What you describe is what I used to have to do when we had a coal range - and as it was our only source of heat for cooking and hot water we had to light it every single day. Some memories one would rather forget!!

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  13. Oh it does look pretty. I would love to have a log burner like yours. I can't imagine what one would put in the log burner when it is not in use. I don't think I would be that fancy either. We haven't lit a fire in the fireplace yet this winter. It was way to warm during Christmas.

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  14. I've read of that method in some of my books about medieval life, it's suppose to be quite effective.

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  15. We put a foil back in during the summer and place a couple of candles in the front. It’s lovely to have the light from the candles but no heat. B x

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  16. I had to laugh over the idea of skulls inside...what would someone say?! Or dare they ask! I need to post soon...we're in the dead of winter (8 degrees the other morning) and still no part in stock to repair our furnace...well, I always felt like I was born in the wrong era, and while I'm not hauling water from the creek or cooking over an open fire, it's been a test in preparedness! Let us know what you put inside...I see some people put candles in theirs (the kind with the realistic flame). Take care, Mary

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  17. Great work with a really good result!
    Love from Titti

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  18. Chuckle. Yes, we do indeed learn something new every day. My new thing I've learnt is that if I both wash, and dry, the dishes- I don't get overwhelmed. I used to just wash and leave them to air dry and those darn dishes were always awaiting to be put away. Silly little thing but somehow always a biggie too.

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Thank-you for visiting my blog. I love it when you leave a comment so please feel free to have your say. Have a great day! Margaret xx