Saturday, 25 April 2020

ANZAC Day


The 25th April is a special day for New Zealand and Australia, when we officially remember our Armed Forces and the sacrifices they have made for our two countries.

Normally services are held at dawn and again during the morning, but this year we have Covid-19 restrictions so a special Stand At Dawn virtual service was used instead.  People were invited to stand at their gateways at dawn and pause for a minute’s silence to remember those who have fallen.


My mother used to make wreaths for the local Anzac service (she made the one in this photo).  My father was a Returned Serviceman, as was his father and several other family members.

World War II - my father and his sister

On this day I like to remember members of my family (there have been several) who have served their country in the Armed Forces, and also to thank those who are currently serving.   

World War I - one of my grandfathers

We shall remember them.
Margaret.


I should perhaps make an explanation about what ANZAC Day is:  It is a national day of remembrance for both New Zealand and Australia - ANZAC stands for "Australia New Zealand Army Corps."  The ANZACs served in World War One, but the day commemorates all servicemen and women in both of our countries.

20 comments:

  1. The pandemic has made celebrations and commemorations take on new formats.

    We will remember them.

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  2. Hope you are feeling a bit better.

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  3. A somber day. I love your family photos. The one from WWI really struck me. He looks like an intense person. I am sorry that you can't observe it in your usual way.

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    1. There is normally a parade followed by a service and the laying of wreaths. The Stand At Dawn idea was a good one and many people participated in it.

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  4. Standing at one's gateway at dawn would be a touching way to mark a day that otherwise couldn't be marked like other years due to Covid-19.

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    1. Some folk turned up their TVs so they could hear the bugle playing the Last Post, while they stood outside.

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    2. That would bring me to tears.

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  5. Hope you are feeling much better

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  6. Standing at your gate at dawn, what a great way to mark the day. Did many in your neighbourhood do it too?

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    1. It looks like the whole country got involved. It was a great way to show solidarity among us all.

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  7. A very different Anzac Day indeed Margaret.
    I will confess to not getting up at 6am to stand in my driveway with a candle, as suggested by the RSL I think, but did wonder how many did. We'll see on the news later I'm sure.
    Nothing is normal at the moment. Hope you're keeping well and not letting everything get on top of you.

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    1. We didn't have a candle but did listen to the Last Post on the phone. I'm struggling with a silly cold at the moment but otherwise all is good.

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  8. I remember ANZAC Day 1995. We didn´t know yet about this and came without much food to Carnarvon, Western Australia.
    Empty parking lot, Wollies closed and we heard music, so we went.
    Nearly all poeple of Carnarvon were in the parade and just few with sad and also proud faces cheering at them.

    Certainly nothing like that here. None of my family members were involved in WWII, but I read most had to join, they were threatened their families are at stake if they don´t.
    My Grandfather was the only watchmaker and hence was allowed to stay home and work, my Mother´s side is not German.

    So sad there is always some stupid, senseless war in the world.
    Always mostly women, but these days also men hoping the soldier-partners come back, kids missing the parent.

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    1. I've always found war to be senseless, but as long as the world has men making wars then countries will have to fight them. Sad but true.

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  9. Powell River has Remembrance Day on November 11. There is a parade to the cenotaph in the old Townsite with a ceremony and laying of wreaths. It is well attended even on rainy days which can always happen in November. - Margy

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    1. Our days sound very similar. I remember when it was a miserable wet/cold morning all the servicemen would be given a tot of rum before the parade, to keep them warm :)

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  10. Margaret I am so moved by the photos you shared with us today. That wreath made by your mom is so precious! You can see the precision of how she braided those leaves on top, I love it. Plus your remembrance of your father and your Aunt is so special. My favorite was the photo of your grandfather, that is such a treasure! He looks young and gentle but strong, well he is, he fought for his country and I'm proud of that!

    Margaret I have been reading your note at the bottom of the comments section about this person who keeps posting about that boomers thing. I have been victim of it twice before and yesterday it posted again ughhh! I don't know what he gets from that. Happy Weekend and Stay Safe!

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    1. I believe those comments are probably being posted by a computer. I was receiving one or two every day for a while but now it is down to about two a week. I just delete them to spam and hope Google soon gets on top of them.
      Have a great day :)

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  11. Standing at the gate at dawn is almost more special and suited than a parade...

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    1. It was certainly different. A lot of people also made poppies to place in their windows or at their mailboxes. It is always very haunting to hear that lone bugle playing, wherever you are.

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Thank-you for visiting my blog. I truly appreciate it when you leave a comment. Have a great day! Margaret xx